Loving Your Work

Your attitude toward work is critical to the life you want and need.

Understand this: You will love your work to the extent that you are really good at it – and are getting better at it every day.

The primary reason why so many people do not like their “work” is that they are not very good at it. Pop culture says that people should find what they “love” and then learn how to do it adequately. Pop culture has it dead wrong.  It just doesn’t work that way. Liking one’s work comes mainly from how competent a person is at it.

People – and this includes you – love their work to the extent they are really, really good at it, and are getting better at it every day.

If you love your work, you have made a major contribution to those with whom you work.  If you don’t, you should set the example and work alone.

It’s VERY difficult to fake it. People will detect your fakery. Any evidence that you dislike some aspects of your work will be taken by others as justification for not liking some or many aspects of their own work. If you perform your love for your work every day and in every way, others will get the message. Turn frustration into love.

Work is central to most lives. The Amish and the Quakers understood that their work in and around the house was a form of prayer. So an Amish farmstead is a work of art.

Your comportment and performance should be a work of art.

In order to do this, it must be implicitly necessary that you are in the learning mode. Implicitly here means that it must become a core aspect of your life.

You have to learn how to get better at what you do. It’s easy to get worse. You can float downstream. That’s the gravitational pull of mediocrity.  If you are a really, really good performer in your role, you will love your work. Period.

– Lee Thayer